Food adulteration 2 essay

A group of female law professors have drafted a letter to the Senate expressing concern over the Kavanaugh appointment.

Food adulteration 2 essay

The origins of tea in UK society A cup of tea is a vital part of everyday life for the majority of people in modern Britain - in fact tea is so integral to our routine, that it is difficult to imagine life without it!

But it was not always so; tea was once a luxury product that only the rich could afford, and at one time there was even a debate about whether it might be bad for the health.

It was over the course of several hundred years that tea gained its place as our national drink, and only relatively recently that its health-giving properties have been recognised.

A lover of tea since her childhood in Portugal, she brought tea-drinking to the English royal court, and set a trend for the beverage among the aristocracy of England in the seventeenth century.

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But the tea that was being drunk in those seventeenth century coffee houses would probably be considered undrinkable now. Between andtea sold in coffee houses was taxed in liquid form. The whole of the day's tea would be brewed in the morning, taxed by a visiting excise officer, and Food adulteration 2 essay kept in barrels and reheated as necessary throughout the rest of the day.

Food adulteration 2 essay

So a visitor to the coffee house in the late afternoon would be drinking tea that had been made hours before in the early morning! The quality of the drink improved afterwhen the system of taxation was altered so that tea was taxed by the leaf rather than by the liquid. Tea for the wealthy and the advent of tea parties Some coffee houses also sold tea in loose leaf form so that it could be brewed at home.

This meant that it could be enjoyed by women, who did not frequent coffee houses. Since it was relatively expensive, tea-drinking in the home must have been largely confined to wealthier households, where women would gather for tea parties. Such a party would be a genteel social occasion, using delicate china pots and cups, silver tea kettles and elegantly carved tea jars and tea tables.

All the equipment would be set up by the servants, and then the tea would be brewed by the hostess aided by a servant on hand to bring hot water and served by her to her guests in dainty cups.

Both green and black teas were popular, and sugar was frequently added though like tea, this was an expensive import ; in the seventeenth century though, it was still unusual for milk to be added to the beverage. We can imagine then that while seventeenth century men were at the coffee houses drinking tea and exchanging gossip, their wives gathered at one another's homes to do exactly the same thing - just in a more refined atmosphere!

Tea for the Masses and the smuggling Fluctuations in the level of tax meant fluctuations in the price of tea, and during the seventeenth century frequent tea-drinking was beyond the means of the majority of British people.

But despite its high price, the British took to tea drinking with enormous enthusiasm. In the eighteenth century there was a clear gap between the large number of people who wanted to enjoy tea regularly, and the relatively small number of people who could actually afford to do so.

And into this gap stepped the smugglers. If tea was smuggled in, no duty was paid on it, so it could be sold much more cheaply. Highly-organised smuggling networks were developed to cater for the popular demand for tea.

Though these gangs of smugglers could frequently be ruthless in their practises, such was the popularity of tea-drinking that many people were prepared to turn a blind eye.

By the later eighteenth century, it is estimated that more tea was smuggled into Britain than was brought in legally. This had two important effects for tea drinking: Secondly, because the smugglers were based in coastal areas and their networks spread across the countryside, it drove the enthusiasm for tea drinking out of the larger towns and cities and into rural areas.

This wiped out the illegal smuggling trade virtually overnight. It still was not cheap, and for many years tea was often adulterated with leaves from other plants or with leaves that had already been brewed, which made it more affordable but much less pleasant!

There was a great deal of concern about adulteration - some unscrupulous individuals added poisonous chemicals to make green 'tea' the right colour - and these concerns led to an increase in popularity in black tea, and a parallel increase in the addition of milk to tea.

Such was the popularity of the beverage that many employers provided free tea to their employees just like tea breaks in offices and factories today!

Although it is not documented, these employers were surely well aware that a cup of tea was just the thing to refresh their employees and perk them up. The great tea debate and the Temperance Movement But not everyone agreed that tea was an appropriate drink for the working classes.

Indeed, from the early eighteenth century well into the nineteenth century a debate raged among middle and upper-class commentators about the benefits or otherwise of tea drinking - and particularly about whether the lower classes should be allowed to drink tea at all.

This was partly based upon a consideration of whether tea might be injurious to health it was a long time before the benefits of tea to health would be scientifically proven but also partly based upon snobbery and a belief that the poor existed essentially to serve the needs of the rich.DescriptionIt is a perennial, with a tap root like the schwenkreis.com stems are 2 to 3 feet high, the lateral branches numerous and spreading, given off at a very considerable angle from the central stem, so that the general effect of the plant, though spreading, is not rich and full, as the branches stretch out some distance in each direction and are but sparsely clothed with leaves of.

Colonial American beverages Hot, non-alcoholic Coffee, tea and chocolate were popular non-alcoholic hot beverages during American Colonial times.

Food adulteration 2 essay

These imports were expensive, but not beyond the reach of the average person. Folks too poor to afford the real thing brewed hot beverages from herbs, flowers, bark, roots, and woody stems. Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (also Antoine Lavoisier after the French Revolution; French: [ɑ̃twan lɔʁɑ̃ də lavwazje]; 26 August – 8 May ) was a French nobleman and chemist who was central to the 18th-century chemical revolution and who had a large influence on both the history of chemistry and the history of biology.

He is widely considered in popular literature as the. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional academic writers.

You can view samples of our professional work here.. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

How best ethical practices of the civil servants can play vital role to curb food adulteration and meet the challenge of GM food. Please write down a comprehensive essay of about words (Word ranges between ) .

What if, the food that we have so much trust on makes us unhealthy? It is very saddening to even think about it. Now- a- days the food that we consume has become very harmful. The term for the degradation of food is known as food adulteration. Food adulteration refers to the degradation in the quality of food.

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