Kinship sociology and aboriginal people

Family and kinship Aboriginal kinship and family structures bind Aboriginal people together Aboriginal kinship and family structures are still cohesive forces which bind Aboriginal people together in all parts of Australia.

Kinship sociology and aboriginal people

Nakangila, Ngalkangila Each person therefore has a patrimoiety and a matrimoietya father's and a mother's subsection group. Extension of the system to non-relatives[ edit ] Outsiders who have significant interaction with such groups may be given a 'skin name', commonly based on the people they have interacted with and the types of interaction.

Some common kinship terms used in Aboriginal English[ edit ] Main article: Australian Aboriginal English The variety of English used by many Australian Aboriginal people employs kinship terms in ways that are based on their equivalents in Australian Aboriginal languages.

Aunty and uncle are terms of address for older people, to whom the speaker may not be related.

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Brother and sister—as well as siblings this term is used to refer to children of one's mother's sister and of father's brother cousinjust as in many indigenous languages.

Cousin-brother and cousin-sister are often used to refer to children of one's mother's sister and father's brother. Cousin refers to children of one's father's sister and mother's brother, but may be extended to any relative of one's own generation, such as one who might share the same great grandparent as their own great grandparent, which is a second-cousin in Aboriginal terms.

In south-east Queensland, daughter is used to refer to any woman of one's great-grandparents' generation.

Kinship sociology and aboriginal people

This is due to the cyclical nature of traditional kinship systems and mirrors usage in many Australian languages. Father and mother include any relative of one's parents' generation, such as uncles, aunts, their own cousins and in-laws.

Grandfather and grandmother can refer to anyone of one's grandparents' generation. Grandfather can also refer to any respected elderly man, to whom the speaker may not be related.

Poison refers to a relation one is obligated to avoid. The term second, or little bit in northern Australia, is used with a distant relative who is described using a close kinship term.

For example, one's second father or little bit father is a man of one's father's generation not closely related to the speaker. Usually having a second mother is having a woman of your own mother's generation who seems to act like a mother and would most likely care for you if anything were to happen to your own parents.

It is contrasted with close, near or true. A skin or skin group is a section determined by the skin of a person's parents, and determines who a person is eligible to marry. Son can refer to any male of the next generation, such as nephews, just as daughter can refer to any female of the next generation, including nieces.Kinship is at the heart of Indigenous society.

A person’s position in the kinship system establishes their relationship to others and to the universe, prescribing their responsibilities towards other people, the land and natural resources.

Indigenous Sociology in Australia

Kinship: Sociology and Aboriginal People Essay Kinship took a central role in the structure of Aboriginal communities because it was their main way of organising people and .

Kinship: Sociology and Aboriginal People Essay Aboriginal societies were admired for their sense of belonging; everybody in their language group was their family.

Everybody helped in the raising, care and discipline of children in the group (Bourke and Edwards, p). How does the process of dispossession affect Aboriginal people - Assignment Example On In Assignment Sample In your response mention land, kinship groups and the Stolen Generation The dispossession of Aboriginal land had a damaging impact on the indigenous peoples in post Australia.

Assessing kinship care for Aboriginal children. A practice guide for child protection practitioners. December Assessing kinship care for Aboriginal children For Aboriginal people, kinship care is a longstanding and integral part of Aboriginal . Family and kinship. Aboriginal kinship and family structures are still cohesive forces which bind Aboriginal people together in all parts of Australia.

Indigenous Sociology for Social Impact – The Other Sociologist